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Daniele Manin's ashes came to Venice in 1868, greeted by crowds of mourners. His memory is still alive today in various parts of the city, such as at his tomb a few steps from the entrance of St. Mark's Basilica. 

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 There are various monuments dedicated to Daniele Manin - both internal and external - in memory of the importance of the role he fulfilled in the city and for the city. These include the Campo Manin along with the monument present in it, and the bust dedicated to him inside the Tommaseo Hall in the Ateneo Veneto. 

The funeral monument is instead located on the left side wall of the St. Mark's Basilica - with its back to the Patriarchal Palace and protected by a gate designed by Luigi Borro, which houses the porphyry sepulcher containing the ashes of the Italian patriot. 

Daniele Manin was a 19th century Venetian politician and key figure in the Risorgimento uprisings in the lagoon, taking the post of President of the Provisional Government of Venice in 1848-1849.      

Aided by his son Giorgio, he died in exile in France on the 22nd of September 1857 and his body was buried in the cemetery of Montmartre, next to his daughter Emilia. With the Treaty of Vienna of the 3rd of October 1866, which sanctioned the annexation of Venice and the Veneto mainland to the Kingdom of Italy, his son Giorgio was able to return home and immediately began to try to bring his father's remains to Venice.   

The mortal remains of his father were brought back to Italy two years later and the date coincided with the exact twenty years from the proclamation of the Republic of Venice: 22 March 1868.   

The body of Daniele Manin was commemorated by a huge emotional crowd and his coffin was accompanied with a long procession from the Saint Lucia railway station to San Marco. A solemn ceremony was held in Saint Mark’s Square and Manin was buried inside the St Mark's Basilica, in the narthex (a transversal space, placed in close contact with the facade). However, a few years later in 1875, the ecclesiastical authorities had the sarcophagus moved to its current location outside the church, under the fifth large arch on the north side.    

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