Venipedia

Magical place that infuses bliss and harmony, reached by crossing an iron bridge that connects the island of San Pietro with the rest of the Castello district.

Field away from the hustle and bustle of many Venetian places, out of the usual tour, so peaceful and relaxing, whose heart, the Church of San Pietro in Castello, is surrounded by green meadows and some trees.

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Most of the buildings in the field are of recent construction; until a few decades ago most of the island land was not occupied and except for some houses the only building of relevance was the cathedral of San Pietro di Castello, that is, the seat of the patriarchate.

From an event linked to this field the feast of the Marie originates: there was in fact the custom of blessing all (or at least twelve) weddings at the cathedral every January 31 (date of the translation of the body of San Marco); it was on this occasion that a group of pirates from Istria raided kidnapping twelve promised brides who were later saved by a group of Venetians; to celebrate the occasion, this festival was instituted, during which it was customary for the Doge to visit the church of Santa Maria Formosa and that twelve girls called Marie were later carried in procession.

The chronicles report of a murder that took place in this place in the tenth century: Stefano Caloprini murdered Domenico Morosini, probably because of the rivalry that ran between the two families; Caloprini later fled Venice, only to return to his homeland thanks to the intercession of Empress Adelaide (which generated further tensions between the opposing factions).

In addition to the church, the bell tower, entirely rebuilt in 1463, should be noted; following a thunderbolt that damaged the structure, the patriarch Maffio Girardi decided for a second reconstruction and entrusted himself to Mauro Codussi. The works began in 1482 and ended around 1490. Codussi increased the height of the bell tower by covering it in Istrian stone and finally inserting a lead-covered wooden dome (later removed during the restoration work carried out in 1670).

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