Venipedia

The Campo can be accessed directly from the Fondamenta degli Ormesini or the Fondamenta di Cannaregio. One of the two ​campi​ in the Venetian Ghetto, it is very large and almost always ​lively.

It is certainly one of the hubs of the Cannaregio district social life and the sense of the Jewish community that characterises it is palpable.

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The extensive campo is surrounded by: a set of bas-reliefs dedicated to the Shoah, the Jewish retirement home, two kosher restaurants, another bas-relief in memory of the Shoah, a study room for the biblical texts of the Lubavitch Orthodox community, the home of the old pawn stalls and craft shops (under the arcades), the German Synagogue, the Jewish Museum of Venice, the Canton Synagogue, the Italian Synagogue (just above a kosher tavern) and private homes.

There are also three 15th century wellheads. One, in Istrian stone, is located in front of the Jewish retirement home, and the other two in pink Verona marble can be found opposite the street number 2895 and towards the rio of S. Gerolamo. Two trees complete the picture. Finally, at number 2899 is a small but well-stocked archive-library, the ‘Renato Maestro’, founded in 1981 and specializing, of course, in Jewish history, religion and narrative.

The bronze bas-reliefs in memory of the Shoah are by the Lithuanian artist and sculptor Arbit Blatas , who lost his mother to a concentration camp. The first was installed on the 25th of April 1980; the second, entitled ‘ The last train’ , on the 19th of September, 1993, commemorates the fiftieth anniversary of the deportation of Jews from the Venice Ghetto. 

Images gallery

One of the three wellheads in the Campo of the Ghetto Nuovo — (Archivio Venipedia/Bazzmann)
The German Synagogue overlooking the field. — (Archivio Venipedia/Bazzmann)
A detail of the portico of the Campo del Ghetto Novo of Venice. — (Archivio Venipedia/Bazzmann)
The Jewish Museum in the Campo of the Ghetto Novo. — (Archivio Venipedia/Bazzmann)
The bronze bas-reliefs in memory of the Shoah by Armit Blatas. — (Archivio Venipedia/Bazzmann)

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